Want a programming career? Look no further.

We’ve been teaching people software development and helping them launch programming careers since 2013. In the years since, we’ve learned so much from the people who’ve trusted us with their careers and lives. As our graduates have gone into their second and third web development jobs after graduating from The Iron Yard, many of them have kept in touch with us, and some even continue to visit campus to share their expertise with our current students.

Throughout the years, we’ve modified our web development courses based on feedback from graduates, employers, and our Advisory Board members. The tech industry changes almost daily, and our students need access to the latest programming tools and strategies if they are going to remain competitive when they graduates from our immersive programs.

That’s why we’ve recently re-tooled our courses and have rolled out a revamped version of our Web Development Career Path. Read More

Five reasons to learn to code during summer break

College summer semesters have been synonymous with make-up classes or squeezing in that course too difficult to tackle during the spring or fall.

Let’s flip the script a bit.

Summer can be about maximizing the weeks in between semesters. It can be about learning a new set of skills that will make students as prepared – even more prepared – for the future.

No matter the major, learning to code is a great option for college students on summer break.

Five reasons learning to code this summer is a smart idea:

Coding is the new literacy
Much in the same way as being fluent in another language is beneficial, so is learning the language of code. People all over the world use technology. The “language” of technology equips us with the ability to communicate across cultures and gives a global angle to our work.

Beef up your resume
Regardless of college major or work experience, the ability to code is attractive to employers in any field. Every line of work has an online presence. Having the ability further that presence is an attractive asset to future employers.

Coding requires new ways of thinking
Problem solving is at the heart of coding. Building a web project from scratch or learning to identify and fix problems requires creativity and loads of critical thinking – both great muscles to exercise heading into the next semester.

You will be more self-sufficient…
Ownership of the online previously lived solely in the hands of IT professionals. Coding know-how provides a new freedom to build and troubleshoot websites without calling in favors. Programming skills can also open up opportunities for freelance work, which may be beneficial in the murky world of post-graduation plans.

…And more collaborative
Projects in all disciplines are rarely created and executed in a vacuum. Learning to give and receive feedback are valuable skills in the marketplace. Coding classes are highly collaborative with participants sharing knowledge, reviewing work and offering advice.

The very nature of college is to prepare for the future. Many industries currently rely on online systems to operate and many more will in the coming years. As more systems become automated, knowing code is valuable in ensuring companies run as smoothly as possible, regardless of the field.

Let us help you make the most of your summer. Take a look at our courses or find a campus location near you.

4 reasons to check out our web development coding courses

Since we started offering web development coding courses in 2013, thousands of people have graduated from The Iron Yard and have gone into careers in software development. With each graduating cohort, we take a hard look at how we can refine and adjust our web development courses to make sure they give students the exact tools they’ll need to become successful developers – no matter which programming language they choose to focus on.

This week, we shared four reasons why you should check out our Web Development Career Path with our friends at Switchup. Below is an excerpt of our conversation. Click here for the whole story on Switchup. Read More

How to hire great programmers

Hiring great programmers is no easy task. Rob Whelan knows exactly how hard it can be. As the VP of Technology for Rhinogram, a healthcare communication solution based in Charleston, South Carolina, he’s done his fair share of hiring and managing programmers.

We wanted to know the truth – how can employers get better at hiring the right programmers for their companies and projects? In the last two years, Rob has hired seven Iron Yard grads. So we went to him for advice. Read More

Friday Q&A: What is a typical day like at The Iron Yard?

In today’s edition of Friday Q&A, we take a look at a day in the life of an Iron Yard student.

“One question we frequently get from prospective students is ‘what will my day look like as an Iron Yard student?'” our student success lead, Watson Mulkey says. “This is an incredibly important question – and one we love to answer – because it helps set expectations for the course. Knowing what your daily schedule will look like and how much time you’ll be committing to learning to code each day is the first step in preparing yourself for an immersive course.”

So what is the typical experience for students at The Iron Yard? Read More

Course Report’s take: Why they love the #YesWeCode Fund

It’s been a couple of weeks since we helped launch the #YesWeCode Fund, but excitement about the Fund (and the opportunity to expose even more people to the power of learning to code) hasn’t slowed one bit. Course Report was kind enough to feature the Fund last week as part of their “Scholarships We Love” series. We could have talked for hours about why initiatives like this are so important and why collaboration is key when it comes to making real change in the industry. 

Here’s how Course Report explained the awesomeness of the Fund:  Read More

Prioritizing inclusivity in 2017

Diversity is one of the most important issues facing the tech industry today. In order to make lasting change and foster an inclusive tech sector, it’s imperative that all stakeholders – from educators and employers to government and civic organizations – are accountable for the role they play in shaping the makeup of the workforce.

The role of code schools

For many, code schools are the entry point to the tech ecosystem and where students go to get the training they need to secure their first job as a developer. As such, code schools have a responsibility to help grow diversity in the tech industry and the unique opportunity to make an impact on workforce demographics. 

First, code schools have the ability to impact change quickly. The majority of our students at The Iron Yard are career changers, meaning we’re training people within the existing workforce to take on new roles in tech. This allows us, and programs like ours, to help generate more diverse talent pools within the tech industry more quickly than any other point of entry (e.g. k-12 programs, four-year degrees, etc).

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Seeing the world through the lens of possibility

Below is the latest post from our executive director of the code school Jessica Mitsch’s blog, Trained for the Future on InfoWorld.com: 

I’m an avid listener of podcasts, and one of my favorite is “How I Built This” on NPR. On the show, entrepreneurs are interviewed about the ideas and creations they’ve brought to life. Several entrepreneurs in the tech space have been interviewed, including the people behind Warby Parker and Airbnb, as well as Angie’s List and Instagram.

I’ve had the great privilege to work among and spend time with a great many entrepreneurs in my role at The Iron Yard. Just last week, I had a conversation with a coworker about what makes an entrepreneur great, and ultimately, it led me to reexamine how we define who is an entrepreneur.

The way I see it, the textbook definition of entrepreneur — “one who organizes, manages, and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise” — is far too narrow. I prefer to broaden the definition of entrepreneur to “a person who sees the world through the lens of what’s possible.”

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A new kind of tech education program: corporate training

This week, the Wall Street Journal published an article, “A New Kind of Jobs Program for Middle America,” discussing how code schools are quickly teaching the software development skills employers across the U.S. desperately need.  

The article suggests that change is “coming for the ecosystem of employers, educational institutions and job-seekers who confront the increasingly software-driven nature of work,” and that “for code schools to have a meaningful impact on the overall labor market, they will have to continue their rapid pace of expansion.” While change is certainly coming for the American workforce – and indeed may already be here – it’s not just the number of code schools that will need to expand to make an impact on the market.

In most cases, in-person code boot camps immerse individual students who have little to no background in computer science in the programming language of their choice. The goal of these in-person immersive courses, like those offered at The Iron Yard, is to prepare graduates to join a company in entry-level software development positions. And that is a worthy goal; there is absolutely a need to provide training to individuals who want to change careers and join the booming tech industry.

But in order to equip enough people with coding skills to meet employer demand, individuals pursuing their own coding education are only half of the equation. For code schools to have the meaningful labor market impact the Wall Street Journal article describes, they also need to take training programs directly to employers and their current employees. Through a holistic approach that includes onboarding new developers, reskilling current employees to become developers and upskilling valuable senior-level talent with new technologies, companies across the U.S. have the opportunity to solve their own talent needs.   

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