The number one mistake women make when considering a career change: Jessy’s story

Jessy could have started the career of her dreams years ago. Not that she disliked her job as a math teacher. In fact, teaching ultimately helped her discover her true passion – technology.

After graduating college with a B.A. in Psychology, Jessy knew she wanted to do something a little different than following the traditional path of becoming a psychologist. She wanted to make an impact, which is what led her to education. “As education became more technology-focused, I became more interested in the technology itself than being an educator,” she said. Read More

Demo Day in the District

img_3029Learning to code and graduating from one of The Iron Yard’s immersive courses is truly a labor of love. It requires dedication to mastering the craft and perseverance when you push past your comfort zone. But in spite of how challenging completing the course may be – or maybe because of how challenging it is – we hear time and time again from our graduates that at the end of their 12 weeks, they feel accomplished and incredibly proud of what they have achieved. That’s why at the end of each cohort, we take the time to celebrate and show off graduates’ new skills at Demo Day! Read More

These two Iron Yard grads want to make it easier for servicemembers to buy condos →

Until just a few months ago, Stella Ma was working on a mobile app to help female travelers find travel companions and Eric Douglas was a public high-school physics teacher in northern Virginia. For various reasons those two divergent career paths led both Ma and Douglas, at the same moment, to a three-month coding bootcamp at The Iron Yard.

Now the duo is gearing up to demo their final project — a web app called OscarMike Condos (OMC) that aims to help identify Department of Veterans Affairs loan-approved condos that are for sale.

Read the full article in Technical.ly DC here.

Meet the DC Campus’ New Dynamic Duo

No longer just the government and political heart of the country, Washington, DC is making its name as a major tech hub. Second only to California’s Bay Area, the DC market has a booming startup scene, innovative companies of all sizes and hundreds of job openings for developers.  

The Iron Yard’s Washington, DC campus recently welcomed two new team members – Brian LeDuc, Campus Director, and Kayt Hensley, Campus Operations Manager. Brian joins The Iron Yard after an evolving career in education, Edtech, and now technology education. Kayt, an Iron Yard veteran, has been an integral team member at our Durham, London and Detroit campuses before landing in DC.

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Iron Yard director Brian LeDuc wants to get coffee with you →

LeDuc comes from a background in education and student leadership training, but worked most recently at the Advisory Board Company as an edtech consultant. In this capacity he says he’s seen technology education evolve over the past few years, and has become “captivated” by the bootcamp model.

Read more about The Iron Yard’s new DC campus director, Brian LeDuc, on Technical.ly.

Go learn about The Iron Yard’s bootcamp offerings →

Coding bootcamps across the country are becoming an increasingly popular way to bring diversity to tech — the bootcamp model costs less, in both time and money, than a traditional computer science degree. At least, that’s the sell D.C. bootcamps like General Assembly and The Iron Yard are trying to make.

Sound like the right option for you? The Iron Yard’s D.C. campus is hosting an open house on Monday, Aug. 22.

Read the full Technical.ly article here.

Returning to the Classroom: Tajaa’s Story

Tajaa Long has always been passionate about education – both her students’ education and her own. She began her career as a math specialist at a public elementary school in St. Louis, and indirectly, it was her students that got Tajaa thinking about learning how to code.  

At one point, Tajaa’s students were having trouble with two-step equations and she was on the lookout for new, innovative approaches to help them master the concept. When she came across Code.org, she downloaded several exercises to help kids work through two step problems, learn to follow instructions and think strategically. The first one she tried – a maze where the students had to write directions to move through it – was a gamble. “I thought, ‘even if it doesn’t work, at least it will be a new learning experience for them,’” Tajaa said.

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