From Amazon to The Iron Yard: Zach’s Story

Zach has always been a numbers guy. For the past four years, he worked at Amazon in southern California and opened a fulfillment center, working as a collator running the numbers for the opps team. It was his responsibility to look at headcount for the staff in the building, analyze the number of packages per category (S, M, L or XL) that had to be shipped that day, and run the numbers to put together a battle plan to get those packages out the door that day.

“What brought me into programming was that within a year of being a collator, I built three Excel macros that would basically do my job for me,” Zach said. “I thought maybe I should give programming a shot.”

For Zach, the tipping point came at the beginning of 2016 when he and his girlfriend started planning their future – getting married, buying a house – and he wanted a job that could support their life together. He began looking at online coding resources and thought, “I can do this,” and started putting a plan in motion.

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Friday Q&A: What is a typical day like at The Iron Yard?

In today’s edition of Friday Q&A, we take a look at a day in the life of an Iron Yard student.

“One question we frequently get from prospective students is ‘what will my day look like as an Iron Yard student?'” our student success lead, Watson Mulkey says. “This is an incredibly important question – and one we love to answer – because it helps set expectations for the course. Knowing what your daily schedule will look like and how much time you’ll be committing to learning to code each day is the first step in preparing yourself for an immersive course.”

So what is the typical experience for students at The Iron Yard? Read More

Friday Q&A: What companies does The Iron Yard work with?

In this week’s installment of Friday Q&A, we’ll answer a question we get on all of our campuses – what companies do you work with?

The short answer to that question is that we work with dozens of companies around the country through our Corporate Training programs, as part of our local Advisory Boards and as hiring partners. Some of the companies we’ve worked with include IBM Design, Microsoft, GitHub, Amazon and AT&T, just to name a few.

But taking a step back, it’s important to look beyond who we work with, to the why and how we work with different companies.

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Iron Journeys: Meet Jennifer Meier, Front-End Engineering in Austin

This week in our Iron Journeys video series, we meet Jennifer Meier, a Front-End Engineering student in Austin. Before starting her course at The Iron Yard, Jennifer was a court reporter. After a recommendation from a friend who took a course at The Iron Yard in Greenville and putting a lot of thought into what she wanted out of a career, Jennifer took the plunge and enrolled in the immersive Front-End Engineering course.

Check out our conversation with Jennifer below to see what it’s really like to be a student at The Iron Yard:

(full transcript below video)

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From solopreneur to developer: Francois’ story

Francois Carstens started his career in graphic design as a freelancer but ultimately found he wanted to be able to both build and design his ideas. After graduating from the Front-End Engineering course at The Iron Yard in Houston at the end of last year, he started a job as developer and never looked back.

Below is more of Francois’ story and you can follow along with his career and insights about working as as developer on his blog, I Learn Code.

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Week in News

In case you missed it, below are this week’s top headlines from The Iron Yard:

Seeing the world through the lens of possibility →

I’ve had the great privilege to work among and spend time with a great many entrepreneurs in my role at The Iron Yard. Just last week, I had a conversation with a coworker about what makes an entrepreneur great, and ultimately, it led me to reexamine how we define who is an entrepreneur.

The way I see it, the textbook definition of entrepreneur — “one who organizes, manages, and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise” — is far too narrow. I prefer to broaden the definition of entrepreneur to “a person who sees the world through the lens of what’s possible.”

Read our executive director of the code school Jessica Mitsch’s latest article on InfoWorld.com.