How to get the most out of a bootcamp – Catching up with Jessica

Jessica Dembe is a graduate of our DC campus. We heard from Jessica on International Women’s Day about her journey learning to program. In this interview with Code with Veni, Jessica gives advice on how to get the most out of immersive coding classes. 

Tell us about yourself

I work as an Associate Technical Consultant at Blackstone Technology Group (@BTGFed). I received my Bachelor of Science Degree in Community Health from the University of Maryland, College Park and I recently graduated from the Front-End Engineering program at The Iron Yard.

My tech related projects include my iFeel app and trying to keep up to speed with JavaScript. In my free time, I like to cook, try peanut-free restaurants and recipes, and figuring out ways to stay active without being bored.

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Iron Journeys: Meet Shannon Riester, front-end developer

Shannon traveled Asia and Australia after realizing a museum-based career wasn’t for her. She heard about the benefits of programming from some friends, tried a few online classes and fell in love. But Shannon knew she needed more support if she was going to turn this into a career. She turned to The Iron Yard and found her path.

Check out our conversation with Shannon here, or read the transcript below.

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Healthcare to software: Jennifer’s story

Last summer, Jennifer told us how she came to The Iron Yard and what it is like to make a career transition. We followed up with Jennifer to get a bit more of her story and to see what life has been like after graduation.

Jennifer Graves started down a traditional, four-year college degree route but soon life took her in a different direction.

“I started working and ended up liking the jobs that I was doing for the most part, and decided to just hold back on college for a little while and focus on the career that I was building at that time,” she said.

Jennifer worked as an administrative assistant at a doctor’s office and later moved into customer service with a national healthcare company. She was soon promoted to a management position, but that transition made her consider what she really wanted to do. Read More

Want a programming career? Look no further.

We’ve been teaching people software development and helping them launch programming careers since 2013. In the years since, we’ve learned so much from the people who’ve trusted us with their careers and lives. As our graduates have gone into their second and third web development jobs after graduating from The Iron Yard, many of them have kept in touch with us, and some even continue to visit campus to share their expertise with our current students.

Throughout the years, we’ve modified our web development courses based on feedback from graduates, employers, and our Advisory Board members. The tech industry changes almost daily, and our students need access to the latest programming tools and strategies if they are going to remain competitive when they graduates from our immersive programs.

That’s why we’ve recently re-tooled our courses and have rolled out a revamped version of our Web Development Career Path. Read More

Five reasons to learn to code during summer break

College summer semesters have been synonymous with make-up classes or squeezing in that course too difficult to tackle during the spring or fall.

Let’s flip the script a bit.

Summer can be about maximizing the weeks in between semesters. It can be about learning a new set of skills that will make students as prepared – even more prepared – for the future.

No matter the major, learning to code is a great option for college students on summer break.

Five reasons learning to code this summer is a smart idea:

Coding is the new literacy
Much in the same way as being fluent in another language is beneficial, so is learning the language of code. People all over the world use technology. The “language” of technology equips us with the ability to communicate across cultures and gives a global angle to our work.

Beef up your resume
Regardless of college major or work experience, the ability to code is attractive to employers in any field. Every line of work has an online presence. Having the ability further that presence is an attractive asset to future employers.

Coding requires new ways of thinking
Problem solving is at the heart of coding. Building a web project from scratch or learning to identify and fix problems requires creativity and loads of critical thinking – both great muscles to exercise heading into the next semester.

You will be more self-sufficient…
Ownership of the online previously lived solely in the hands of IT professionals. Coding know-how provides a new freedom to build and troubleshoot websites without calling in favors. Programming skills can also open up opportunities for freelance work, which may be beneficial in the murky world of post-graduation plans.

…And more collaborative
Projects in all disciplines are rarely created and executed in a vacuum. Learning to give and receive feedback are valuable skills in the marketplace. Coding classes are highly collaborative with participants sharing knowledge, reviewing work and offering advice.

The very nature of college is to prepare for the future. Many industries currently rely on online systems to operate and many more will in the coming years. As more systems become automated, knowing code is valuable in ensuring companies run as smoothly as possible, regardless of the field.

Let us help you make the most of your summer. Take a look at our courses or find a campus location near you.

Corporate Training spotlight: Instructor Curtis Schlak

Recently we brought you the story of how we are helping business like Blackbaud and Spoonflower teach their employees coding skills needed in the workplace through our Corporate Training program.

Technology advancements are providing solutions for companies of all sizes. Employers want to be sure their current workforce is trained to leverage these tools to grow their business.

Today we talk with one of our Corporate Training instructors, Curtis Schlak, about his experience working with companies, the benefit of equipping employees and retro games of tic-tac-toe.

Tell us about your professional background.

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4 reasons to check out our web development coding courses

Since we started offering web development coding courses in 2013, thousands of people have graduated from The Iron Yard and have gone into careers in software development. With each graduating cohort, we take a hard look at how we can refine and adjust our web development courses to make sure they give students the exact tools they’ll need to become successful developers – no matter which programming language they choose to focus on.

This week, we shared four reasons why you should check out our Web Development Career Path with our friends at Switchup. Below is an excerpt of our conversation. Click here for the whole story on Switchup. Read More

Iron Journeys: Meet Christopher Vanderkolk, Austin code school grad

This week in our Iron Journeys video series, we meet Christopher Vanderkolk, an Iron Yard Austin code school grad. Before joining The Iron Yard, Chris worked in retail for over a decade. After realizing his career had become stagnant and craving a challenge, Chris turned to software development.

Check out our conversation with Chris below to see what it’s really like to be a student at The Iron Yard. (Transcript below video)

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A new generation of programmers: Hillside High School learns to code

Our team in Durham recently partnered with a small cohort of Hillside High School students for a nine week coding class. Students had the opportunity to learn about HTML, CSS, and introductory JavaScript during the class, which was held twice a week and taught by some of our Durham-based Iron Yard staff and volunteers.  We love seeing teachers like Dr. Logan implement new innovative programs for these high school scholars to help prepare them for successful careers.

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